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The following procedure is only intended as a general guide to assist residents with safety issues. Every emergency situation is different, requiring a unique response. It is the resident's responsibility to use common sense, to be familiar with the building's emergency and evacuation plans and to prepare themselves for emergency situations properly.

All residents have a responsibility to know and observe all House Rules pertaining to safety. Residents must be familiar with the building, particularly fire exits, stairwells, landings and door operations, as well as the location and operation of each fire extinguisher and fire alarm box.

Please read the below sections to learn more about the following emergency situations:

Fire

Each residential floor has two fire exit doors and stairwells (Diamond Head and Ewa). Fire exit doors will open from the inside without using keys.

If you should discover a fire, stay calm, and call the fire department immediately by dialing 911 on your phone. Do not assume that someone else already notified the fire department. Foster Tower is assigned to the Waikiki Fire Station (Kapahulu Avenue and Ala Wai Boulevard) and the fire department has entry access to both the building and the elevators. When reporting a fire, make sure to give your exact location to the dispatch personnel. You can say: “I am calling to report a fire at 2500 Kalakaua Avenue. There is a fire on floor X, coming from apartment XXXX.”Listen to the instructions of the dispatch personnel and follow their directive.


If the fire is small, you may try to bring it under control. Paper or trash fires can be extinguished with water. However, you should never use water on grease or electrical fires. Each residence should have a fire extinguisher rated for adequate fire protection. Your local hardware store can advise you on purchasing the correct type and size fire extinguisher. The cost ($10-$50) of these compact fire extinguishers is minimal, and they are widely available to cover different types of fire sources. 
As mandated by local authorities, each apartment must be equipped with a properly functioning smoke detector. It is the Owner's responsibility to make sure that the apartment is equipped with an operating smoke detector unit. Make sure to check the batteries periodically.


In case of a larger fire, immediately inform all occupants of the fire by activating the fire alarm, located on each residential floor by the fire exit doors, by the 01 and 10 apartments. Be familiar, at all times, with the location of the red alarm boxes. Pull the handle to activate the alarm. An alarm will sound on all floors and the alarm panel in the lobby will identify the location of the activated alarm.

Your and your residents' personal safety should always come first. If the fire is beyond control, leave the area and evacuate the building immediately by using the fire exit stairway.


DO NOT USE THE ELEVATORS. All elevators will automatically return to the main lobby for the Fire Department's use and will only operate using the fire department's keys.
When using the stairway, go down the right side of the stairway, leaving the left side for Fire Department personnel. Always leave the stairway doors closed. This will keep the smoke out of the stairwell. DO NOT PROP STAIRWAY DOORS OPEN.


Upon hearing the fire alarm siren, you need to evacuate the building. 
Before opening your apartment door, first feel it with the back of your hand for heat.


>>> If the inside of your door is hot or you see smoke seeping into your apartment, the hallway may be engulfed with fire or smoke. This is especially important for the studio apartments. Brace the door firmly with your foot to avoid the door from blowing inward from the heat and smoke pressure built up in the hallway. Open the door slightly while bracing and holding it firmly. Keep your body away from the door opening. If smoke or flame is present and too intense for escape, close the door immediately, but do not lock it. Seal off all cracks around the door with wet towels to help keep the smoke out of your apartment, but LEAVE YOUR DOOR UNLOCKED so the Fire Department can enter to search all apartments for any injured or trapped residents. 
Fill your bathtub and sinks with water for later use if needed. 
If the smoke or fire is below your apartment coming up from the side of the building, close all windows and doors on that side of the building. 
Don't panic, keep calm until rescue of some type will arrive. 
Remain close to the floor for fresh air, as smoke and heat rise to the top.


>>> If your door does not feel hot from the inside, and you don't see smoke seeping into your apartment, brace the door firmly with your foot and carefully open the door to check the hallways. If the hallways are passable, evacuate your apartment by using the nearest fire escape stairway. Use only the fire exit stairway to evacuate the building. Do not use the elevators. Exit only on the ground floor. Although the Diamond Head exit stairs are equipped with emergency backup lights, electricity may be down from the fire, so each person should take a flashlight with them if possible.
Walk away from building entrances, and keep the entrances open for emergency personnel use. Return to the building only if and when the fire department signals that it is OK to return to the building.

Earthquakes

An earthquake is the sudden, rapid shaking of the Earth, caused by the braking and shifting of subterranean rock. Since it is not possible to predict when an earthquake will occur, it is essential that you and your family are prepared ahead of time.

Prepare for Earthquakes
- Securely fasten shelves to walls.
- Keep large or heavy objects on lower shelves.
- Store breakable items in lower cabinets with doors and latches.
- Inspect and repair electrical wiring; these can be potential fire hazards during an earthquake.
- Check your apartment for structural defects.
- Keep toxic and flammable items securely stored in cabinets with doors and latches.
- Identify safe places in your home or office where you will ride out an earthquake. The best protection is under heavy furniture where you are protected from falling debris.
- Learn how to turn off electricity and water.
- Get an emergency supply kit.

Plan to act Quickly
- During or immediately after an earthquake, the best protection is to get under heavy furniture, such as a desk, table or bench, staying away from large windows, mirrors or other glass.
- The greatest danger is directly outside buildings, at exits and along exterior walls, due to falling debris.
- If you are already outside, stay clear of buildings, power lines, overpasses and elevated expressways.
- Most deaths and injuries are due to falling walls, flying glass or debris.
- Expect aftershocks. Smaller quakes (and sometimes larger ones) can often follow hours or days after the initial shake, causing further damage to weakened buildings and structures.


Check for gas leaks gas is piped from the ground storage tank to the rooftop, so it is possible that gas lines are compromised in the event of an earthquake, hurricane or other disaster. The vertical pipe runs behind the trash chute. If you smell gas or hear a hissing or blowing noise, open a window and leave the building immediately; and call the gas company, your resident manager or property manager.



Explosions
If There is an Explosion
- Take shelter against your desk or a sturdy table.
- Exit the building ASAP.
- Do not use elevators.
- Check for fire and other hazards.
- Take your emergency supply kit if time allows.


If There is a Fire
- Exit the building ASAP.
- Crawl low if there is smoke
- Use a wet cloth, if possible, to cover your nose and mouth.
- Use the back of your hand to feel the upper, lower, and middle parts of closed doors.
- If the door is not hot, brace yourself against it and open slowly.
- If the door is hot, do not open it. Look for another way out.
- Do not use elevators
- If you catch fire, do not run. Stop-drop-and-roll to put out the fire.
- If you are at home, go to a previously designated meeting place.
- Account for your family members and carefully supervise small children.
- Never go back into a burning building.


If You Are Trapped in Debris
- If possible, use a flashlight to signal your location to rescuers.
- Avoid unnecessary movement so that you don't kick up dust.
- Cover your nose and mouth with anything you have on hand. (Dense-weave cotton material can act as a good filter. Try to breathe through the material.)
- Tap on a pipe or wall so that rescuers can hear where you are.
- If possible, use a whistle to signal rescuers.
- Shout only as a last resort. Shouting can cause a person to inhale dangerous amounts of dust.


Hurricanes
Some of the things you can do to prepare for the unexpected, such as making an emergency supply kit and developing a family communications plan, are the same for both a natural or man-made emergency. However, there are important differences among potential emergencies that will impact the decisions you make and the actions you take. Learn more about the potential emergencies that could happen where you live and the appropriate way to respond to them. In addition, learn about the emergency plans that have been established in Hawaii and stay informed. Contact information for Hawaii resources include:

State of Hawaii Homeland Security Oahu Civil Defense Agency, 
3949 Diamond Head Rd. 
Honolulu, HI 96816-4495
Phone: (808) 733-4246
650 South King Street 
Honolulu, HI 96813
(808) 523-4121
Website: http://www.scd.state.hi.us


Department of Civil Defense Division
3949 Diamond Head Road
Honolulu, HI 96816
(808) 733-4301


Citizen Corps: Get Involved in Preparing your Community. Citizen Corps, Homeland Security's grassroots effort, localizes preparedness messages and provides opportunities for citizens to get emergency response training; participate in community exercises; and volunteer to support local first responders.
Citizen Corps County Councils
City & County of Honolulu Citizen
Corps Council
Contact: William Ballfour
Phone: (808) 523-4121
Email:wballfour@co.honolulu.hi.us


During and emergency, stay informed! Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should listen to NOAA Weather Radio, watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.


In any emergency, authorities may or may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should monitor TV or radio news reports for information or official instructions as they become available. If you're specifically told to evacuate or seek medical treatment, do so immediately.


STAYING PUT: Whether you are at home, work or elsewhere, there may be situations when it's simply best to stay where you are and avoid any uncertainty outside. There are other circumstances when staying put and creating a barrier between yourself and potentially contaminated air outside, a process known as "sealing the room," is a matter of survival. Use available information to assess the situation. If you see large amounts of debris in the air, or if local authorities say the air is badly contaminated, you may want to take this kind of action. The process used to seal the room is considered a temporary protective measure to create a barrier between you and potentially contaminated air outside. It is a type of sheltering in place that requires preplanning.
To "Shelter in Place and Seal the Room"
- Bring your family and pets inside.
- Lock doors, close windows, air vents and fireplace dampers.
- Turn off fans, air conditioning and forced air heating systems.
- Take your emergency supply kit unless you have reason to believe it has been contaminated.
- Go into an interior room with few windows, if possible.
- Seal all windows, doors and air vents with plastic sheeting and duct tape. Consider measuring and cutting the sheeting in advance to save time.
- Be prepared to improvise and use what you have on hand to seal gaps so that you create a barrier between yourself and any contamination.
- Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.
Learn how and when to turn off utilities:
If there is damage to your home or you are instructed to turn off your utilities:
- Locate the electric, gas and water shut-off valves.
- Keep necessary tools near gas and water shut-off valves.
- Teach family members how to turn off utilities.
- If you turn the gas off, a professional must turn it back on. Do not attempt to do this yourself.


EVACUATING: There may be conditions under which you will decide to get away, or there may be situations when you are ordered to leave. Plan how you will assemble your family and anticipate where you will go. Choose several destinations in different directions so you have options in an emergency. Create an evacuation plan:
- Plan places where your family will meet, both within and outside of your immediate neighborhood.
- If you have a car, keep a half tank of gas in it at all times in case you need to evacuate.
- Become familiar with alternate routes and other means of transportation out of your area.
- If you do not have a car, plan how you will leave if you have to.
- Take your emergency supply kit unless you have reason to believe it has been contaminated.
- Lock the door behind you.
- Take your pets with you, but understand that only service animals may be permitted in public shelters. Plan how you will care for your pets in an emergency.

If time allows:
- Call or email the "out-of-state" contact in your family communications plan.
- Tell them where you are going.
- If there is damage to your home and you are instructed to do so, shut off water, gas and electricity before leaving.
- Leave a note telling others when you left and where you are going.
- Check with neighbors who may need a ride.


At Work and School: Like individuals and families, schools, daycare providers, workplaces, neighborhoods and apartment buildings should all have site-specific emergency plans. Ask about plans at the places where your family spends the most time: work, school and other places you frequent. If none exist, consider volunteering to help develop one. You will be better prepared to safely reunite your family and loved ones during an emergency if you think ahead, and communicate with others in advance. For more information on working together, visit Citizen Corps at http://www.citizencorps.gov.
Schools and Daycare: If you are a parent, or guardian of an elderly or disabled adult, make sure schools and daycare providers have emergency response plans.
- Ask how they will communicate with families during a crisis.
- Ask if they store adequate food, water and other basic supplies. 
- Find out if they are prepared to "shelter-in-place" if need be, and where they plan to go if they must get away. Visit Ready Kids at http://www.ready.gov/kids/ for more information. For more information on developing emergency preparedness plans for schools, please visit the U.S. Department of Education at http://www.ed.gov/emergencyplan. For more information on special needs, see Disaster Preparedness For People With Disabilities at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prepare/specialplans.shtm from FEMA, and Emergency Preparedness for Individuals with Disabilities' Resource Center http://www.disabilitypreparedness.gov
For seniors, see information from the Red Cross: Disaster Preparedness for Seniors by Seniors at http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/beprepared/seniors.html.
Workplaces: If you are an employer, make sure your workplace has a building evacuation plan that is regularly practiced. Visit Ready Business at http://www.ready.gov/business for more information.
- Take a critical look at your heating, ventilation and air conditioning system to determine if it is secure or if it could feasibly be upgraded to better filter potential contaminants, and be sure you know how to turn it off if you need to.
- Think about what to do if your employees can't go home.
- Make sure you have appropriate supplies on hand.


Neighborhoods and Apartment Buildings: A community working together during an emergency makes sense.
- Talk to your neighbors about how you can work together during an emergency.
- Find out if anyone has specialized equipment like a power generator, or expertise such as medical knowledge, that might help in a crisis.
- Decide who will check on elderly or disabled neighbors.
- Make back-up plans for children in case you can't get home in an emergency.
- Sharing plans and communicating in advance is a good strategy.


In a High-Rise Building:
- Note where the closest emergency exit is.
- Be sure you know another way out in case your first choice is blocked.
- Take cover against a desk or table if things are falling.
- Move away from file cabinets, bookshelves or other things that might fall.
- Face away from windows and glass.
- Move away from exterior walls.
- Determine if you should stay put, "shelter-in-place" or get away.
- Listen for and follow instructions.
- Take your emergency supply kit, unless there is reason to believe it has been contaminated.
- Do not use elevators.
- Stay to the right while going down stairwells to allow emergency workers to come up.
For more information on working together, visit Neighborhoods and Apartments at www.ready.gov/america/makeaplan/neighborhoods.html.


In a Moving Vehicle:
- If there is an explosion or other factor that makes it difficult to control the vehicle, pull over, stop the car and set the parking brake.
- If the emergency could impact the physical stability of the roadway, avoid overpasses, bridges, power lines, signs and other hazards.
- If a power line falls on your car you are at risk of electrical shock, stay inside until a trained person removes the wire.
- Listen to the radio for information and instructions as they become available.


Each person's needs and abilities are unique, but every individual can take important steps to prepare for all kinds of emergencies and put plans in place. By evaluating your own personal needs and making an emergency plan, you can be better prepared for any situation. A commitment to planning today will help you prepare for any emergency situation. Preparing makes sense. Get ready now.
- Consider how a disaster might affect your individual needs.
- Plan to make it on your own, at least for a period of time. It's possible that you will not have access to a medical facility or even a drugstore.
- Identify what kind of resources you use on a daily basis and what you might do if they are limited or not available.
- Get an emergency supply kit.
- If you must evacuate, take your pets with you, if possible. However, if you are going to a public shelter, it is important to understand that animals may not be allowed inside.
- Plan in advance for shelter alternatives that will work for both you and your pets; consider loved ones or friends outside of your immediate area who would be willing to host you and your pets in an emergency.


Create a Support Network
- If you anticipate needing assistance during a disaster talk to family, friends and others who will be part of your personal support network.
- Write down and share each aspect of your emergency plan with everyone in your support network.
- Make sure everyone knows how you plan to evacuate your home or workplace and where you will go in case of a disaster.
- Make sure that someone in your local network has an extra key to your home and knows where you keep your emergency supplies.
- Teach those who will help you how to use any lifesaving equipment, administer medicine in case of an emergency. Practice your plan with those who have agreed to be part of your network.


Biological Threats & Influenza Epidemic
A biological attack is the deliberate release of germs or other biological substances that can make you sick. Many agents must be inhaled, enter through a cut in the skin or be eaten to make you sick. Some biological agents, such as anthrax, do not cause contagious diseases. Others, like the smallpox virus, can result in diseases you can catch from other people. Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may or may not be immediately obvious. While it is possible that you will see signs of a biological attack, as was sometimes the case with the anthrax mailings, it is perhaps more likely that local health care workers will report a pattern of unusual illness or there will be a wave of sick people seeking emergency medical attention. You will probably learn of the danger through an emergency radio or TV broadcast, or some other signal used in your community. You might get a telephone call or emergency response workers may come to your door. In the event of a biological attack, public health officials may not immediately be able to provide information on what you should do. It will take time to determine exactly what the illness is, how it should be treated, and who is in danger. However, you should watch TV, listen to the radio, or check the Internet for official news including the following:
- Are you in the group or area authorities consider in danger?
- What are the signs and symptoms of the disease?
- Are medications or vaccines being distributed?
- Where? Who should get them?
- Where should you seek emergency medical care if you become sick?


During a declared biological emergency:
1. If a family member becomes sick, it is important to be suspicious.
2. Do not assume, however, that you should go to a hospital emergency room or that any illness is the result of the biological attack. Symptoms of many common illnesses may overlap.
3. Use common sense, practice good hygiene and cleanliness to avoid spreading germs, and seek medical advice.
4. Consider if you are in the group or area authorities believe to be in danger.
5. If your symptoms match those described and you are in the group considered at risk, immediately seek emergency medical attention.


If you are potentially exposed:
1. Follow instructions of doctors and other public health officials.
2. If the disease is contagious expect to receive medical evaluation and treatment. You may be advised to stay away from others or even deliberately quarantined.
3. For non-contagious diseases, expect to receive medical evaluation and treatment.


If you become aware of an unusual and suspicious substance nearby:
If you become aware of an unusual and suspicious release of an unknown substance nearby, it doesn't hurt to protect yourself. Be prepared to improvise to protect your nose, mouth, eyes and cuts in your skin.
- Cover your mouth and nose with layers of fabric that can filter the air but still allow breathing. For
example, two to three layers of cotton such as a t-shirt, handkerchief or towel. Otherwise, several
layers of tissue or paper towels may help.
- Wash with soap and water.
- Contact authorities.

Cover Your Nose and Mouth: Be prepared to improvise with what you have on hand to protect your nose, mouth, eyes and cuts in your skin. Anything that fits snugly over your nose and mouth, including any denseweave cotton material, can help filter contaminants in an emergency. It is very important that most of the air you breathe comes through the mask or cloth, not around it. Do whatever you can to make the best fit possible for children. There are also a variety of face masks readily available in hardware stores that are rated based on how small a particle they can filter in an industrial setting. Simple cloth face masks can filter some of the airborne "junk" or germs you might breathe into your body, but will probably not protect you from chemical gases. Still, something over your nose and mouth in an emergency is better than nothing.
Antibiotics: While antibiotics are often an appropriate treatment for the diseases associated with biological weapons, the specific drug must match the illness to be effective. One antibiotic, for example, may be appropriate for treating anthrax exposure, but is inappropriate for treating smallpox. All antibiotics can cause side effects including serious reactions. Plan to speak with your health care provider in advance about what makes sense for your family.

Use Common Sense: At the time of a declared biological emergency, if a family member becomes sick, it is important to be suspicious. Do not automatically assume, however, that you should go to an emergency room or that any illness is the result of the biological attack. Symptoms of many common illnesses may overlap. Use common sense, practice good hygiene and cleanliness to avoid spreading germs, and seek medical advice.

- Stay healthy. Eat well. Get plenty of rest.
- Use common sense to determine if there is immediate danger.
- Wash your hands with soap and water frequently.
- In a declared biological emergency or developing epidemic, there may be reason to stay away from crowds where others may be infected.
- There may be times when you would want to consider wearing a face mask to reduce spreading germs if you yourself are sick, or to avoid coming in contact with contagious germs if others around you are sick.


Symptoms and Hygiene
Symptoms: If a family member develops any of the symptoms below, keep them separated from others if possible, practice good hygiene and cleanliness to avoid spreading germs, and seek medical advice.
- A temperature of more than 100 degrees
- Nausea and vomiting
- Stomachache
- Diarrhea
- Pale or flushed face
- Headache
- Cough
- Earache
- Thick discharge from nose
- Sore throat
- Rash or infection of the skin
- Red or pink eyes
- Loss of appetite
- Loss of energy or decreases in activity


Hygiene: If someone is sick, you should practice good hygiene and cleanliness to avoid spreading
germs.
- Wash your hands with soap and water frequently.
- Do not share food or utensils.
- Cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing.
- Consider having the sick person wear a face mask to avoid spreading germs.
Plan to share health-related information with others, especially those who may need help understanding the situation and what specific actions to take.

INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC

A pandemic is a global disease outbreak. An influenza pandemic occurs when a new influenza A virus emerges for which there is little or no immunity in the human population and the virus begins to cause serious illness and then spreads easily person-to-person worldwide. The federal government, states, communities and industry are taking steps to prepare for and respond to an influenza pandemic. If a pandemic occurs, it is likely to be a prolonged and widespread outbreak that could require temporary changes in many areas of society, such as schools, work, transportation and other public services. An informed and prepared public can take appropriate actions to decrease their risk during a pandemic. To be prepared for such an emergency, the U.S Department of Health and Human Services encourages individuals, businesses and communities to:
- Talk with your local public health officials and health care providers, who can supply information about the signs and symptoms of a specific disease outbreak and recommend prevention and control actions. Adopt business/school practices that encourage sick employees/students to stay home and anticipate how to function with a significant portion of the workforce/school population absent due to illness or caring for ill family members.
- Practice good health habits, including eating a balanced diet, exercising daily, and getting sufficient rest. In addition, take common-sense steps to stop the spread of germs including frequent hand washing, covering coughs and sneezes and staying away from others as much as possible when you are sick.
- Stay informed about pandemic influenza and be prepared to respond. Consult www.pandemicflu.gov frequently for updates on national and international information on pandemic influenza.
More Information
For more information on preparing for and responding to an influenza pandemic visit the U.S Department of Health and Human Service's website at 
www.pandemicflu.gov


Nuclear, Chemical and Radiation Threats
A nuclear blast is an explosion with intense light and eat, a damaging pressure wave and widespread radioactive material that can contaminate the air, water and ground surfaces for miles around. During a nuclear incident, it is important to avoid radioactive material, if possible. While experts may predict at this time that a nuclear attack is less likely than other types, terrorism by its nature is unpredictable.
If there is advanced warning of an attack: Take cover immediately, as far below ground as possible, though any shield or shelter will help protect you from the immediate effects of the blast and the pressure wave.


If there is no warning:
1. Quickly assess the situation.
2. Consider if you can get out of the area or if it would be better to go inside a building to limit the amount of radioactive material you are exposed to.
3. If you take shelter go as far below ground as possible, close windows and doors, turn off air conditioners, heaters or other ventilation systems. Stay where you are, watch TV, listen to the radio, or check the Internet for official news as it becomes available.
4. To limit the amount of radiation you are exposed to, think about shielding, distance and time.
- Shielding: If you have a thick shield between yourself and the radioactive materials more of the radiation will be absorbed, and you will be exposed to less.
- Distance: The farther away you are away from the blast and the fallout the lower your exposure.
- Time: Minimizing time spent exposed will also reduce your risk.

Use available information to assess the situation. If there is a significant radiation threat, health care authorities may or may not advise you to take potassium iodide. Potassium iodide is the same stuff added to your table salt to make it iodized. It may or may not protect your thyroid gland, which is particularly vulnerable, from radioactive iodine exposure. Plan to speak with your health care provider in advance about what makes sense for your family. For more information, see Potassium Iodide at http://www.bt.cdc.gov/radiation/ki.asp from Centers for Disease Control.

CHEMICAL THREAT

A chemical attack is the deliberate release of a toxic gas, liquid or solid that can poison people and the environment.
Possible Signs of Chemical Threat
- Many people suffering from watery eyes, twitching, choking, having trouble breathing or losing coordination.
- Many sick or dead birds, fish or small animals are also cause for suspicion.


If You See Signs of Chemical Attack: Find Clean Air Quickly
- Quickly try to define the impacted area or where the chemical is coming from, if possible.
- Take immediate action to get away.
- If the chemical is inside a building where you are, get out of the building without passing through the contaminated area, if possible.
- If you can't get out of the building or find clean air without passing through the area where you see signs of a chemical attack, it may be better to move as far away as possible and shelter-in-place.
- If you are outside, quickly decide what is the fastest way to find clean air. Consider if you can get out of the area or if you should go inside the closest building and "shelter-in-place."


If You Think You Have Been Exposed to a Chemical
If your eyes are watering, your skin is stinging, and you are having trouble breathing, you may have been exposed to a chemical.
- If you think you may have been exposed to a chemical, strip immediately and wash.
- Look for a hose, fountain, or any source of water, and wash with soap if possible, being sure not to scrub the chemical into your skin.
- Seek emergency medical attention.

RADIATION THREAT

A radiation threat, commonly referred to as a "dirty bomb" or "radiological dispersion device (RDD)", is the use of common explosives to spread radioactive materials over a targeted area. It is not a nuclear blast. The force of the explosion and radioactive contamination will be more localized. While the blast will be immediately obvious, the presence of radiation will not be clearly defined until trained personnel with specialized equipment are on the scene. As with any radiation, you want to try to limit exposure. It is important to avoid breathing radiological dust that may be released in the air.


If There is a Radiation Threat or "Dirty Bomb"
1. If you are outside and there is an explosion or authorities warn of a radiation release nearby, cover your nose and mouth and quickly go inside a building that has not been damaged. If you are already inside check to see if your building has been damaged. If your building is stable, stay where you are. Close windows and doors; turn off air conditioners, heaters, or other ventilation systems.
2. If you are inside and there is an explosion near where you are or you are warned of a radiation release inside, cover nose and mouth and go out side immediately. Look for a building or other shelter that has not been damaged and quickly get inside. Once you are inside, close windows and doors; turn off air conditioners, heaters, or other ventilation systems.
3. If you think you have been exposed to radiation, take off your clothes and wash as soon as possible.
4. Stay where you are, watch TV, listen to the radio, or check the Internet for official news as it becomes available.
5. Remember: To limit the amount of radiation you are exposed to, think about shielding, distance and time.
- Shielding: If you have a thick shield between yourself and the radioactive materials more of the radiation will be absorbed, and you will be exposed to less.
- Distance: The farther away you are away from the blast and the fallout the lower your exposure.
- Time: Minimizing time spent exposed will also reduce your risk. As with any emergency, local authorities may not be able to immediately provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should watch TV, listen to the radio, or check the Internet often for official news and information as it becomes available. For more general information, see "Are you Ready?" at http://www.fema.gov/areyouready from Federal Emergency Management Agency.


Disaster Preparedness Resources
Some of the things you can do to prepare for the unexpected, such as making an emergency supply kit and developing a family communications plan, are the same for both a natural or man-made emergency. However, there are important differences among potential emergencies that will impact the decisions you make and the actions you take. Learn more about the potential emergencies that could happen where you live and the appropriate way to respond to them. In addition, learn about the emergency plans that have been established in Hawaii and stay informed. Contact information for Hawaii resources include:

State of Hawaii Homeland Security Oahu Civil Defense Agency, 
3949 Diamond Head Rd. 
Honolulu, HI 96816-4495
Phone: (808) 733-4246
650 South King Street 
Honolulu, HI 96813
(808) 523-4121
Website: http://www.scd.state.hi.us


Department of Civil Defense Division
3949 Diamond Head Road
Honolulu, HI 96816
(808) 733-4301


Citizen Corps: Get Involved in Preparing your Community. Citizen Corps, Homeland Security's grassroots effort, localizes preparedness messages and provides opportunities for citizens to get emergency response training; participate in community exercises; and volunteer to support local first responders.
Citizen Corps County Councils
City & County of Honolulu Citizen
Corps Council
Contact: William Ballfour
Phone: (808) 523-4121
Email:wballfour@co.honolulu.hi.us


During and emergency, stay informed! Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should listen to NOAA Weather Radio, watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.


In any emergency, authorities may or may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should monitor TV or radio news reports for information or official instructions as they become available. If you're specifically told to evacuate or seek medical treatment, do so immediately.


STAYING PUT: Whether you are at home, work or elsewhere, there may be situations when it's simply best to stay where you are and avoid any uncertainty outside. There are other circumstances when staying put and creating a barrier between yourself and potentially contaminated air outside, a process known as "sealing the room," is a matter of survival. Use available information to assess the situation. If you see large amounts of debris in the air, or if local authorities say the air is badly contaminated, you may want to take this kind of action. The process used to seal the room is considered a temporary protective measure to create a barrier between you and potentially contaminated air outside. It is a type of sheltering in place that requires preplanning.
To "Shelter in Place and Seal the Room"
- Bring your family and pets inside.
- Lock doors, close windows, air vents and fireplace dampers.
- Turn off fans, air conditioning and forced air heating systems.
- Take your emergency supply kit unless you have reason to believe it has been contaminated.
- Go into an interior room with few windows, if possible.
- Seal all windows, doors and air vents with plastic sheeting and duct tape. Consider measuring and cutting the sheeting in advance to save time.
- Be prepared to improvise and use what you have on hand to seal gaps so that you create a barrier between yourself and any contamination.
- Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.
Learn how and when to turn off utilities:
If there is damage to your home or you are instructed to turn off your utilities:
- Locate the electric, gas and water shut-off valves.
- Keep necessary tools near gas and water shut-off valves.
- Teach family members how to turn off utilities.
- If you turn the gas off, a professional must turn it back on. Do not attempt to do this yourself.


EVACUATING: There may be conditions under which you will decide to get away, or there may be situations when you are ordered to leave. Plan how you will assemble your family and anticipate where you will go. Choose several destinations in different directions so you have options in an emergency. Create an evacuation plan:
- Plan places where your family will meet, both within and outside of your immediate neighborhood.
- If you have a car, keep a half tank of gas in it at all times in case you need to evacuate.
- Become familiar with alternate routes and other means of transportation out of your area.
- If you do not have a car, plan how you will leave if you have to.
- Take your emergency supply kit unless you have reason to believe it has been contaminated.
- Lock the door behind you.
- Take your pets with you, but understand that only service animals may be permitted in public shelters. Plan how you will care for your pets in an emergency.

If time allows:
- Call or email the "out-of-state" contact in your family communications plan.
- Tell them where you are going.
- If there is damage to your home and you are instructed to do so, shut off water, gas and electricity before leaving.
- Leave a note telling others when you left and where you are going.
- Check with neighbors who may need a ride.


At Work and School: Like individuals and families, schools, daycare providers, workplaces, neighborhoods and apartment buildings should all have site-specific emergency plans. Ask about plans at the places where your family spends the most time: work, school and other places you frequent. If none exist, consider volunteering to help develop one. You will be better prepared to safely reunite your family and loved ones during an emergency if you think ahead, and communicate with others in advance. For more information on working together, visit Citizen Corps at http://www.citizencorps.gov.
Schools and Daycare: If you are a parent, or guardian of an elderly or disabled adult, make sure schools and daycare providers have emergency response plans.
- Ask how they will communicate with families during a crisis.
- Ask if they store adequate food, water and other basic supplies. 
- Find out if they are prepared to "shelter-in-place" if need be, and where they plan to go if they must get away. Visit Ready Kids at http://www.ready.gov/kids/ for more information. For more information on developing emergency preparedness plans for schools, please visit the U.S. Department of Education at http://www.ed.gov/emergencyplan. For more information on special needs, see Disaster Preparedness For People With Disabilities at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prepare/specialplans.shtm from FEMA, and Emergency Preparedness for Individuals with Disabilities' Resource Center http://www.disabilitypreparedness.gov
For seniors, see information from the Red Cross: Disaster Preparedness for Seniors by Seniors at http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/beprepared/seniors.html.
Workplaces: If you are an employer, make sure your workplace has a building evacuation plan that is regularly practiced. Visit Ready Business at http://www.ready.gov/business for more information.
- Take a critical look at your heating, ventilation and air conditioning system to determine if it is secure or if it could feasibly be upgraded to better filter potential contaminants, and be sure you know how to turn it off if you need to.
- Think about what to do if your employees can't go home.
- Make sure you have appropriate supplies on hand.


Neighborhoods and Apartment Buildings: A community working together during an emergency makes sense.
- Talk to your neighbors about how you can work together during an emergency.
- Find out if anyone has specialized equipment like a power generator, or expertise such as medical knowledge, that might help in a crisis.
- Decide who will check on elderly or disabled neighbors.
- Make back-up plans for children in case you can't get home in an emergency.
- Sharing plans and communicating in advance is a good strategy.


In a High-Rise Building (like Foster Tower):
- Note where the closest emergency exit is.
- Be sure you know another way out in case your first choice is blocked.
- Take cover against a desk or table if things are falling.
- Move away from file cabinets, bookshelves or other things that might fall.
- Face away from windows and glass.
- Move away from exterior walls.
- Determine if you should stay put, "shelter-in-place" or get away.
- Listen for and follow instructions.
- Take your emergency supply kit, unless there is reason to believe it has been contaminated.
- Do not use elevators.
- Stay to the right while going down stairwells to allow emergency workers to come up.
For more information on working together, visit Neighborhoods and Apartments at www.ready.gov/america/makeaplan/neighborhoods.html.


In a Moving Vehicle:
- If there is an explosion or other factor that makes it difficult to control the vehicle, pull over, stop the car and set the parking brake.
- If the emergency could impact the physical stability of the roadway, avoid overpasses, bridges, power lines, signs and other hazards.
- If a power line falls on your car you are at risk of electrical shock, stay inside until a trained person removes the wire.
- Listen to the radio for information and instructions as they become available.


Each person's needs and abilities are unique, but every individual can take important steps to prepare for all kinds of emergencies and put plans in place. By evaluating your own personal needs and making an emergency plan, you can be better prepared for any situation. A commitment to planning today will help you prepare for any emergency situation. Preparing makes sense. Get ready now.
- Consider how a disaster might affect your individual needs.
- Plan to make it on your own, at least for a period of time. It's possible that you will not have access to a medical facility or even a drugstore.
- Identify what kind of resources you use on a daily basis and what you might do if they are limited or not available.
- Get an emergency supply kit.
- If you must evacuate, take your pets with you, if possible. However, if you are going to a public shelter, it is important to understand that animals may not be allowed inside.
- Plan in advance for shelter alternatives that will work for both you and your pets; consider loved ones or friends outside of your immediate area who would be willing to host you and your pets in an emergency.


Create a Support Network
- If you anticipate needing assistance during a disaster talk to family, friends and others who will be part of your personal support network.
- Write down and share each aspect of your emergency plan with everyone in your support network.
- Make sure everyone knows how you plan to evacuate your home or workplace and where you will go in case of a disaster.
- Make sure that someone in your local network has an extra key to your home and knows where you keep your emergency supplies.
- Teach those who will help you how to use any lifesaving equipment, administer medicine in case of an emergency. Practice your plan with those who have agreed to be part of your network.


Family Communication Checklist

Review your personal needs and consider the following when stocking your supply kit:

Water
- One gallon of water per person per day, for drinking and sanitation.
- Children, nursing mothers, and sick people may need more water.
- During warm weather climates more water may be necessary.
- Store water tightly in clean plastic containers such as soft drink bottles.
- Keep at least a three-day supply of water per person.
Food
- Store at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food.
- Select foods that require no refrigeration, preparation, or cooking, and little or no water.
- Pack a manual can opener and eating utensils.
- Avoid salty foods, as they will make you thirsty.
- Choose foods your family will eat.
- Ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits and vegetables
- Protein or fruit bars
- Dry cereal or granola
- Peanut butter
- Dried fruit
- Nuts
- Crackers
- Canned juices
- Non-perishable pasteurized milk
- High energy foods
- Vitamins
- Food for infants
- Comfort/stress foods
Clean Air
Some potential emergencies could send tiny microscopic "junk" into the air. For example flooding could create airborne mold which could make you sick and an explosion may release very fine debris that can cause lung damage. A biological terrorist attack may release germs that can make you sick if inhaled or absorbed through open cuts. Many of these agents can only hurt you if they get into your body, so think about creating a barrier between yourself and any contamination.
Nose and Mouth Protection
Face masks or dense-weave cotton material, that snugly covers your nose and mouth and is specifically fit for each member of the family. Do whatever you can to make the best fit possible for children. Be prepared to improvise with what you have on hand to protect your nose, mouth, eyes and cuts in your skin. Anything that fits snugly over your nose and mouth, including any dense-weave cotton material, can help filter contaminants in an emergency. It is very important that most of the air you breathe comes through the mask or cloth, not around it. Do whatever you can to make the best fit possible for children. There are also a variety of face masks readily available in hardware stores that are rated based on how small a particle they can filter in an industrial setting. Given the different types of emergencies that could occur, there is not one solution for creating a barrier between yourself and any contamination in the air. For instance, simple cloth face masks can filter some of the airborne "junk" or germs you might breathe into your body, but will probably not protect you from chemical gases. Still, something over your nose and mouth in an emergency is better than nothing. Limiting how much "junk" gets into your body may impact whether or not you get sick or develop disease.
Other Barriers
- Heavyweight plastic garbage bags or plastic sheeting
- Duct tape
- Scissors


There are circumstances when staying put and creating a barrier between yourself and potentially contaminated air outside, a process known as "shelter-in-place," is a matter of survival. You can use these things to tape up windows, doors and air vents if you need to seal off a room from outside contamination. Consider precutting and labeling these materials. Anything you can do in advance will save time when it counts. Use available information to assess the situation. If you see large amounts of debris in the air, or if local authorities say the air is badly contaminated, you can use these things to tape up windows, doors and air vents if you need to seal off a room. Read more: Deciding to Stay or Go.
HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air Filtration) Filter Fans
Once you have sealed a room with plastic sheeting and duct tape you may have created a better barrier between you and any contaminants that may be outside. However, no seal is perfect and some leakage is likely. In addition to which, you may find yourself in a space that is already contaminated to some degree. Consider a portable air purifier, with a HEPA filter, to help remove contaminants from the room where you are sheltering. These highly efficient filters have small sieves that can capture very tiny particles, including some biological agents. Once trapped within a HEPA filter contaminants cannot get into your body and make you sick. While these filters are excellent at filtering dander, dust, molds, smoke, biological agents and other contaminants, they will not stop chemical gases. Some people, particularly those with severe allergies and asthma, use HEPA filters in masks, portable air purifiers as well as in larger home or industrial models to continuously filter the air.
First Aid Kit
In any emergency a family member or you yourself may be cut, burned or suffer other injuries. If you have these basic supplies you are better prepared to help your loved ones when they are hurt. Remember, many injuries are not life threatening and do not require immediate medical attention. Knowing how to treat minor injuries can make a difference in an emergency. Consider taking a first aid class, but simply having the following things can help you stop bleeding, prevent infection and assist in decontamination.


Things you should have:
- Two pairs of Latex, or other sterile gloves (if you are allergic to Latex).
- Sterile dressings to stop bleeding.
- Cleansing agent/soap and antibiotic towelettes to disinfect.
- Antibiotic ointment to prevent infection.
- Burn ointment to prevent infection.
- Adhesive bandages in a variety of sizes.
- Eye wash solution to flush the eyes or as general decontaminant.
- Thermometer
- Prescription medications youtake every day such as insulin, heart medicine and asthma inhalers. You should periodically rotate medicines to account for expiration dates.
- Prescribed medical supplies such as glucose and blood pressure monitoring equipment and supplies.


Things it may be good to have:
- Cell Phone
- Scissors
- Tweezers
- Tube of petroleum jelly or other lubricant


Non-prescription drugs:
- Aspirin or nonaspirin pain reliever
- Anti-diarrhea medication
- Antacid (for upset stomach)
- Laxative


Unique Family Needs
Remember the unique needs of your family members when making your emergency supply kit and family emergency plan.
For Baby:
- Formula
- Diapers
- Bottles
- Powdered milk
- Medications
- Moist towelettes
- Diaper rash ointment


For Seniors and Adults with Special Needs:
- Ask your doctor about storing prescription medications such as heart and high blood pressure medication, insulin and other prescription drugs.
- Denture needs
- Contact lenses and supplies
- Extra eye glasses If you take medicine or use a medical treatment on a daily basis, be sure you have what you need to make it on your own for at least a week, maybe longer.
- Make a list of prescription medicines including dosage, treatment and allergy information.
- Talk to your pharmacist or doctor about what else you need to prepare.
- If you undergo routine treatments administered by a clinic or hospital or if you receive regular services such as home health care, treatment or transportation, talk to your service provider about their emergency plans. Work with them to identify backup service providers and incorporate them into your personal support network.
- Consider other personal needs such as eyeglasses, hearing aids and hearing aid batteries, wheelchair batteries, and oxygen.
Emergency Documents: Include copies of important documents in your emergency supply kits such as family records, medical records, wills, deeds, - - - Have copies of your medical insurance and Medicare cards readily available.
- Keep a list of the style and serial number of medical devices or other life-sustaining devices. Include operating information and instructions.
- Make sure that a friend or family member has copies of these documents.
- Include the names and contact information of your support network, as well as your medical providers.
- If you have a communication disability, make sure your emergency information notes the best way to communicate with you.
- Keep these documents in a water proof container for quick and easy access.


For People with Disabilities:
- Create a support network to help in an emergency.
- Tell these people where you keep your emergency supplies.
- Give one member of your support network a key to your house or apartment.
- Contact your city or county government's emergency information management office. Many local offices keep lists of people with disabilities so they can be located quickly in a sudden emergency.
- Wear medical alert tags or bracelets to help identify your disability.
- If you are dependent on dialysis or other life sustaining treatment,know the location and availability of more than one facility.
- Show others how to operate your wheelchair.
- Know the size and weight of your wheelchair, in addition to whether or not it is collapsible, in case it has to be transported.
- Additional Supplies for People with Disabilities:
- Prescription medicines, list of medications including dosage, list of any allergies.
- Extra eyeglasses and hearing-aid batteries.
- Extra wheelchair batteries, oxygen.
- Keep a list of the style and serial number of medical devices.
- Medical insurance and Medicare cards.
- List of doctors, relatives or friends who should be notified if you are hurt.
For information and tools related to emergency preparedness for persons with disabilities see the Interagency Coordinating Council on Emergency Preparedness for Individuals with Disabilities' Resource Center at www.disabilitypreparedness.gov.
Preparing Your Pets for Emergencies Makes Sense
If you are like millions of animal owners nationwide, your pet is an important member of your household. The likelihood that you and your animals will survive an emergency such as a fire or flood, tornado or terrorist attack depends largely on emergency planning done today. Some of the things you can do to prepare for the unexpected, such as assembling an animal emergency supply kit and developing a pet care buddy system, are the same for any emergency. Whether you decide to stay put in an emergency or evacuate to a safer location, you will need to make plans in advance for your pets. Keep in mind that what's best for you is typically what's best for your animals. If you must evacuate, take your pets with you if possible. However, if you are going to a public shelter, it is important to understand that animals may not be allowed inside. Plan in advance for shelter alternatives that will work for both you and your pets. Make a back-up emergency plan in case you can't care for your animals yourself. Develop a buddy system with neighbors, friends and relatives to make sure that someone is available to care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so. Be prepared to improvise and use what you have on hand to make it on your own for at least three days, maybe longer.

DISASTER SUPPLY CHECKLIST

The following list is to help you determine what to include in your disaster supplies kit that will meet your family's needs.


First Aid Supplies
- Adhesive bandages, various sizes
- 5 " x 9 " sterile dressing
- Conforming roller gauze bandage
- Triangular bandages
- 3 " x 3 " sterile gauze pads
- 4 " x 4 " sterile gauze pads
- Roll 3 " cohesive bandage
- Germicidal hand wipes or
- waterless, alcohol-based hand sanitizer
- Antiseptic wipes
- Pairs large, medical grade,
- non-latex gloves
- Tongue depressor blades
- Adhesive tape, 2 " width
- Antibacterial ointment
- Cold pack
- Scissors (small, personal)
- Tweezers
- Assorted sizes of safety pins
- Cotton balls
- Thermometer
- Tube of petroleum jelly or other lubricant
- Sunscreen
- CPR breathing barrier, such as a face shield
- First aid manual


Non-Prescription and Prescription Medicine Kit Supplies
- Aspirin and non-aspirin pain reliever
- Anti-diarrhea medication
- Antacid (for stomach upset)
- Laxative
- Vitamins
- Prescriptions
- Extra eyeglasses/contact lenses


Sanitation and Hygiene Supplies 
- Washcloth and towel
- Heavy-duty plastic garbage bags and ties for personal sanitation uses and toilet paper
- Towelettes, soap, hand sanitizer
- Medium-sized plastic bucket with tight lid
- Tooth paste, toothbrushes
- Disinfectant and household chlorine bleach
- Shampoo, comb, and brush
- A small shovel for digging a latrine
- Deodorants, sunscreen
- Toilet paper
- Razor, shaving cream
- Contact lens solutions
- Lip balm, insect repellent
- Mirror
- Feminine supplies


Equipment and Tools
- Portable, battery-powered radio or television and extra batteries
- NOAA Weather Radio, if appropriate for your area
- Flashlight and extra batteries
- Signal flare
- Matches in a waterproof container (or waterproof matches)
- Shut-off wrench, pliers, shovel, and other tools
- Duct tape and scissors
- Plastic sheeting
- Whistle
- Small canister, ABC-type fire extinguisher
- Tube tent
- Compass
- Work gloves
- Paper, pens, and pencils
- Needles and thread
- Battery-operated travel alarm clock


Kitchen items
- Manual can opener
- Mess kits or paper cups, plates, and plastic utensils
- All-purpose knife
- Household liquid bleach to treat drinking water
- Sugar, salt, pepper
- Aluminum foil and plastic wrap
- Resealable plastic bags
- Small cooking stove and a can of cooking fuel (if food must be cooked)


Comfort Items
- Games
- Cards
- Books
- Toys for kids
- Foods
- Water
- Ready-to-eat meats, fruits, and vegetables
- Canned or boxed juices, milk, and soup
- High-energy foods such as peanut butter, jelly, low-sodium crackers, granola bars, and trail mix
- Vitamins
- Special foods for infants or persons on special diets
- Cookies, hard candy
- Instant coffee
- Cereals
- Powdered milk


Clothes and Bedding Supplies
- Complete change of clothes
- Sturdy shoes or boots
- Rain gear
- Hat and gloves
- Extra socks
- Extra underwear
- Thermal underwear
- Sunglasses
- Blankets/sleeping bags and pillows


Documents and Keys
- Personal identification
- Cash and coins
- Credit cards
- Extra set of house keys and car keys
- Copies of the following:
- Birth certificate
- Marriage certificate
- Driver's license
- Social Security cards
- Passports
- Wills
- Deeds
- Inventory of household goods
- Insurance papers
- Immunization records
- Bank and credit card account numbers
- Stocks and bonds
- Emergency contact list and phone numbers
- Map of the area and phone numbers of places you could go